Virginia Tech, Tiny Houses, and Distance Education in Higher Ed

One way the Small House Society helps facilitate the small house movement is by connecting with colleges teaching about housing, sustainability, and urban design.

Virginia Tech is utilizing distance education technologies to bring specialists into the classroom.  On 14 April 2015, I had the opportunity to be a visiting guest for a sustainability course taught by Luke Juran. Using Skype I was able to present and interact with the students in the course. Below is a photo from our Skype session.

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I’ve been inspired by the increased interest in tiny houses among students and faculty in higher education. Those focusing on sustainability and urban planning are incorporating smaller and more efficient living spaces into our built spaces. This tells me that we’re reaching a point of critical mass within the small house movement.

Click here to read another longer version of this article discusses distance education in more depth.

Canadian Student Launching Small House Business Needs Guidance

16 January 2015

Greetings Small House Society Members:

My name is Cory Stephens. I’m an Instructor of Entrepreneurship at the University of Victoria currently teaching a program in Prince Rupert, British Columbia, Canada.

We have a student in our program who is developing a contractor business specializing in Tiny House Construction for Aboriginal Communities in Northern British Columbia and Yukon.

As part of our entrepreneurship program, we include a mentorship component during which students work with mentors to validate business assumptions working towards development of a stronger business plan. Previously, our student a red-seal journeyman carpenter, has been the team manager for a small-house project completed in Altin, British Columbia (4 small houses built).

The small-house initiative was the inspiration for his new business and hopes to expand the small-house movement throughout Northern British Columbia and Yukon.

At this stage of his entrepreneurship program, our student is seeking a mentor which will provide guidance in developing his business plan and building his business.

Any referrals to a potential mentor for our student would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Cory Stephens,
Program Manager, Northwest Aboriginal Canadian Entrepreneurs
Email: cory_stephens70@hotmail.com

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